How Dajjali (anti-christ) programming corrupts Black Muslim Moral Psychology


The nature of dajjaali programming is that it contradicts scripture and scriptural evidence. For example:

Say if we say that if men did what they were supposed to do, then the women would fall on place automatically. Okay. So we admit by default that women are affected by what men do. Fair enough, now we have to consider whether or not, men are affected by what women do. If we say no, they aren’t, then that is dajjaali thinking and contradicts our sacred law as well as our aqeeda.

If we say that men are affected by what women do, then we see the wisdom and guidance of our Lord in defining the behavioral and moral standards of both men and women, and not just men, as well as a clear path to empoweringt Muslim men and women to break the spell of dajjaali control over our thinking.

So If Allah and His Prophet صلي الله عليه و سلم have already defined the behavioral standards for both men and women, then we have to accept that men and women are equally responsible and accountable to Allah regarding the fulfillment or dereliction of their duties to Him. That’s Islamic logic. Holding one gender of Muslims accountable and not the other is pure dajjaali programming. No Muslim man or woman is obliged to accept that paradigm.
Muslim men and women are both commanded to obey Allah and His Messenger and are not obligated in any way to obey shaitaan or to adopt dajjaali ideology in exchange for tawheed.

If no means no, as far as a woman’s right to her own body (and it does) then no should mean no as far as peoples rights to their own beliefs, and the pursuit of saving their souls from the hellfire.

Iman Luqman Ahmad


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One response to “How Dajjali (anti-christ) programming corrupts Black Muslim Moral Psychology”

  1. How Dajjali (anti-christ) programming corrupts Black Muslim Moral Psychology — The Lotus Tree Blog – ABDALA ASMART Avatar

    […] بواسطة How Dajjali (anti-christ) programming corrupts Black Muslim Moral Psychology — The Lotus Tree Blog […]

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